Lecture: Using urban ecology in design: using design in urban ecology

May 14, 2015


Description

This lecture geared toward planners and landscape architects will introduce an argument for why design needs urban ecology and urban ecology needs design. Joan Iverson Nassauer, Professor at the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan, and Co-Editor-in-Chief of Landscape and Urban Planning, will discuss the scientific foundations for the design and planning implications of the following essential paradigms that support that exchange: urban ecology paradigms, the landscape ecology paradigm, the novel ecosystems paradigm, the ecosystem services paradigm, and ecological aesthetic paradigms. The presentation will suggest how practitioners can access scientific developments in the field of urban ecology to advance how land is planned and landscapes are designed to meet the environmental, social, economic and aesthetic needs of communities and regions. Through case studies, the presentation will cover the following topics: green infrastructure design, ecological restoration, urban and rural watershed management, transportation planning, and the development of metropolitan neighborhoods and brownfields.


Instructor: Joan Iverson Nassauer

develops ecological design proposals and investigates how human experience is related to landscape patterns and processes. A Fellow by the American Society of Landscape Architects (1992) and a Fellow of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (2007), she was named Distinguished Scholar by the International Association of Landscape Ecology (IALE) (2007) and Distinguished Practitioner of Landscape Ecology (1998) by US - IALE. Her work offers strategies for basing ecological design on strong science and interdisciplinary collaboration, and these strategies have been applied internationally.

An early discovery and continuing theme of her research is that evidence of human care in the landscape has a powerful normative effect on human perceptions and behavior to change landscapes. Her research has influenced green infrastructure design, ecological restoration, urban and rural watershed management, transportation planning, and the development of metropolitan neighborhoods and brownfields. The author of more than 80 refereed papers and books, she addressed ecological design in Placing Nature (Island Press 1997), and showed how to use scenario approaches to integrated assessment in From the Corn Belt to the Gulf (RFF Press 2007). Current research projects relate to ecological design for highly vacant urban neighborhoods, ecological implications of suburban landscape patterns, and agricultural landscape patterns to incorporate perennial biofuels.